Jul 23, 2012

Reading Check-In ~ Parade's End

As I settled into the first pages I wasn't sure I was going to like Ford's writing style, his use of dialogue tags seemed a little choppy, isn't that a silly thing to condemn a writer for? Well, I was berated as I found myself bound up in his vivid language.
Guernica by Pablo Picasso
Tietjens had been staring --staring with the intentness of a maddened horse-- at his, Macmaster's face! And grey! Shapeless! The nose like a pallid triangle on a bladder of lard! That was Tietjens face... He could still feel the blow, physical in the pit of his stomach! He had thought Tietjens was going mad: that he was mad. It had passed. Tietjens had assumed the mask of his indolent, insolent self.
Picasso's art passed through my mind as I read this description. We see Christopher Tietjens torn apart, reinterpreted, and what Macmaster feels, it's what I do as I look at paintings from the cubist movement: unsettled.

Tietjens is a very interesting character with his enigmatic speeches, I can't make out if they're serious or jests... I'm pretty sure he's just trying to get a reaction. He seems very grounded but isn't afraid to cross the boundaries of convention at work. His home-life is in turmoil stemming from the infidelity of his wife Sylvia, and the knowledge that his child may not be his. You get the impression there's incredible depth to him but he's restrained.

Originally I kept confusing the author's name with
Pre-Raphaelite artist Ford Madox Brown, it turns out he
was Ford Madox Ford's namesake and maternal grandfather.
I'm only into the third chapter but Parade's End's apparent themes of marriage and infidelity put me in mind of The Forsyte Saga. I have a feeling it's going to be a very thought-provoking novel.

Jul 13, 2012

Poetry and Emotions

The first time I read Keats' Ode to a Nightingale  I sensed a quiver of something... intangible. When heard it read aloud my pulse quickened and as I recited it, the words came to life. They flow so beautifully! I felt the emotions layered within the poem.

Suddenly I was restless. The buildup of having suppressed certain feelings pushed me to try to reach a dream I've harbored and have patiently waited for the right time. I believe, it's now and really hope I can set it's wheels in motion.

The poem itself has an overall impression of longing and fear. Of wanting to flourish with inspiration and anxiety of not reaching full potential. With each reading it stays fresh, there's something I've missed: how the words work with each other, other interpretations, nuances of how they reflect what was going on in Keats' life, how they relate to mine or its dissimilarities.

I think truly great poetry awakens feelings that are tucked away; Kindles a new vitality or sensibility. Which poems have struck a chord with you? 

Jul 23, 2012

Reading Check-In ~ Parade's End

As I settled into the first pages I wasn't sure I was going to like Ford's writing style, his use of dialogue tags seemed a little choppy, isn't that a silly thing to condemn a writer for? Well, I was berated as I found myself bound up in his vivid language.
Guernica by Pablo Picasso
Tietjens had been staring --staring with the intentness of a maddened horse-- at his, Macmaster's face! And grey! Shapeless! The nose like a pallid triangle on a bladder of lard! That was Tietjens face... He could still feel the blow, physical in the pit of his stomach! He had thought Tietjens was going mad: that he was mad. It had passed. Tietjens had assumed the mask of his indolent, insolent self.
Picasso's art passed through my mind as I read this description. We see Christopher Tietjens torn apart, reinterpreted, and what Macmaster feels, it's what I do as I look at paintings from the cubist movement: unsettled.

Tietjens is a very interesting character with his enigmatic speeches, I can't make out if they're serious or jests... I'm pretty sure he's just trying to get a reaction. He seems very grounded but isn't afraid to cross the boundaries of convention at work. His home-life is in turmoil stemming from the infidelity of his wife Sylvia, and the knowledge that his child may not be his. You get the impression there's incredible depth to him but he's restrained.

Originally I kept confusing the author's name with
Pre-Raphaelite artist Ford Madox Brown, it turns out he
was Ford Madox Ford's namesake and maternal grandfather.
I'm only into the third chapter but Parade's End's apparent themes of marriage and infidelity put me in mind of The Forsyte Saga. I have a feeling it's going to be a very thought-provoking novel.

Jul 13, 2012

Poetry and Emotions

The first time I read Keats' Ode to a Nightingale  I sensed a quiver of something... intangible. When heard it read aloud my pulse quickened and as I recited it, the words came to life. They flow so beautifully! I felt the emotions layered within the poem.

Suddenly I was restless. The buildup of having suppressed certain feelings pushed me to try to reach a dream I've harbored and have patiently waited for the right time. I believe, it's now and really hope I can set it's wheels in motion.

The poem itself has an overall impression of longing and fear. Of wanting to flourish with inspiration and anxiety of not reaching full potential. With each reading it stays fresh, there's something I've missed: how the words work with each other, other interpretations, nuances of how they reflect what was going on in Keats' life, how they relate to mine or its dissimilarities.

I think truly great poetry awakens feelings that are tucked away; Kindles a new vitality or sensibility. Which poems have struck a chord with you? 
© November's Autumn
Maira Gall